What exactly is the Miami typhoon turnover chain?

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Add the Turnover Chain to the list of props and gimmicks used by college football teams to encourage and celebrate defensive performances.

The large gold, blingy necklace adorned with a giant “U” is worn by members of the Miami Hurricane’s defense after they force a turnover.

About exactly

What exactly is the Miami Hurricane turnover chain?

About Hurricane
A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane (), typhoon (), tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone. A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; while in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as “tropical cyclones” or “severe cyclonic storms”.
“Tropical” refers to the geographical origin of these systems, which form almost exclusively over tropical seas. “Cyclone” refers to their winds moving in a circle, whirling round their central clear eye, with their winds blowing counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and blowing clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The opposite direction of circulation is due to the Coriolis effect. Tropical cyclones typically form over large bodies of relatively warm water. They derive their energy through the evaporation of water from the ocean surface, which ultimately recondenses into clouds and rain when moist air rises and cools to saturation. This energy source differs from that of mid-latitude cyclonic storms, such as nor’easters and European windstorms, which are fueled primarily by horizontal temperature contrasts. Tropical cyclones are typically between 100 and 2,000 km (62 and 1,243 mi) in diameter.
The strong rotating winds of a tropical cyclone are a result of the conservation of angular momentum imparted by the Earth’s rotation as air flows inwards toward the axis of rotation. As a result, they rarely form within 5° of the equator. Tropical cyclones are also almost completely absent from Earth’s southwestern quartersphere, mainly because the shapes of the African and South American continents permit the Benguela and Humboldt Currents to cover ocean basins as far north as 5˚N with excessively cool water. These powerful cold currents also produce much stronger vertical wind shear in the South Atlantic and Southeast Pacific, which typically prevent tropical depressions and minor storms there from developing into cyclones and prevent even the waters of the Brazil Current from being so hot as analogous western boundary currents or ocean gyres. Also, the African easterly jet and areas of atmospheric instability which gives rise to cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, along with the Asian monsoon and Western Pacific Warm Pool, are feature of the Northern Hemisphere and Australia.
Coastal regions are particularly vulnerable to the impact of a tropical cyclone, compared to inland regions. The primary energy source for these storms is warm ocean waters, therefore these forms are typically strongest when over or near water, and weaken quite rapidly over land. Coastal damage may be caused by strong winds and rain, high waves (due to winds), storm surges (due to severe pressure changes), and the potential of spawning tornadoes. Tropical cyclones also draw in air from a large area—which can be a vast area for the most severe cyclones—and concentrate the precipitation of the water content in that air (made up from atmospheric moisture and moisture evaporated from water) into a much smaller area. This continual replacement of moisture-bearing air by new moisture-bearing air after its moisture has fallen as rain, may cause extremely heavy rain and river flooding up to 40 kilometres (25 mi) from the coastline, far beyond the amount of water that the local atmosphere holds at any one time.
Though their effects on human populations are often devastating, tropical cyclones can relieve drought conditions. They also carry heat energy away from the tropics and transport it toward temperate latitudes, which may play an important role in modulating regional and global climate.

The idea apparently originated, according to Sports Illustrated, two weeks before the season started when Miami cornerbacks coach Mike Rumph asked Anthony John Machado, a local Miami jeweler, if he would make a rope chain players could wear after forcing a turnover. 

The idea evolved into a large Cuban chain style necklace with the U adorned with orange and green jewel stones.

What exactly is the Miami Hurricane turnover chain?

The chain officially is made up of a 36-inch, 2.5-kilogram, 10-karat gold chain, with 900 orange and green sapphire stones arranged in a “U” that is 6.5 inches wide.

Check out some of the videos and other appearances of the chain during the 2017 season so far:

Will No. 7 Miami don the turnover chain again on Saturday night when it plays No. 3 Notre Dame at home? 

The game is set for a 7 p.m. CT kickoff from Miami.

Cheryl Wray covers college football and other sports for Alabama Media Group. Find her on Twitter @cwray_sports and by email at [email protected]